Britain’s volcanic past | Ian Vince | Comment is free | guardian.co.uk

Our glory days are in our past, but we have inherited a landscape shaped by every paroxysm, twitch and twist the Earth throw at us. On Mull and the Ardnamurchan peninsula lie the massive remains of volcanoes at least as awesome as anything Iceland can clog the skies with. On Skye, an entire range of mountains, the Cuillins, is formed from what was once a magma chamber – a vast underground reservoir of lava. On the Giant’s Causeway and the Hebridean island of Staffa, what’s left of 700,000 square miles of lava traps – where molten rock simply poured through fissures on the ground to create a flood of basalt – are such a striking sight that they are not so much a tourist attraction but a place of pilgrimage.

A nice little article over at the Guardian. This is one of the reasons my “retirement plan” is to travel around Blighty in a campervan, just taking photographs and enjoying the variety of my home country’s landscapes.

You may also be interested in the British Landscape Club. The club was founded by the Guardian article’s author, Ian Vince.

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