Category Archives: Scale Modelling

More Collett Coaches

One of my earliest commissions, some years ago now, was to build three Collett coaches from Just Like The Real Thing kits. Who would believe another different client would commission three almost identical coaches a year or so later!

JLTRT 7mm scale kit of a Collett 57ft Bow-ended E127 1st/3rd composite coach.
JLTRT 7mm scale kit of a Collett 57ft Bow-ended E127 1st/3rd composite coach.
JLTRT 7mm scale kit of a Collett 57ft Bow-ended C54 All Third coach.
JLTRT 7mm scale kit of a Collett 57ft Bow-ended C54 All Third coach.
JLTRT 7mm scale kit of a Collett 57ft Bow-ended D94 Brake Third coach.
JLTRT 7mm scale kit of a Collett 57ft Bow-ended D94 Brake Third coach.

These models are all to 1/43rd scale, 7mm to 1ft, and Finescale O Gauge. As they will run as a semi-permanent set, the client requested Kadee knuckle couplings between the vehicles, leaving the standard screw-link couplings at the outer ends. The livery is the first British Railways “blood and custard”, which was applied to gangwayed passenger stock from 1948 until 1956. Although virtually impossible to see, the interiors have been fitted out as authentically as possible, and the guard’s compartment is fully detailed as well.

In case you missed it—although it would be hard to do!—I am a professional modelmaker. I take commissions to build chiefly UK-outline railway subjects to 7mm scale. You can see more about my work on my web site, or follow me on Twitter (@HKModelmaker).

BR Mk1 RMB

The workshop has seen a few builds come to a conclusion—or near conclusion in one case—in the past couple of weeks. Sometimes I find commissioned work gets bogged down for various reasons, and oddly this seems to get worse the closer to completion a model gets. I can’t explain why, but it’s probably to do with lots of little bits and pieces, sub-assemblies and paint jobs all taking their time to come together.

Just completed, aside from one or two quality control issues that appeared after the appointment with the official photographer, is an etched brass kit of a Mk1 RMB (Restaurant Miniature Buffet). This has been a rather protracted build, due in part to ineptitude on my side, and it being a complex kit of several thousand components.

A 1/43rd scale MMP kit, built with modifications to include electric train heating and air braking equipment.

The model represents an RMB, dating from the early 1960s but still running in service in the early 1980s. The kit was adapted to show the modifications and upgrades made to the vehicles over the years. Modifications included strips down the sides of each door, designed to prevent corrosion, and the inclusion of air braking and electric train heating equipment in addition to the vacuum braking and steam heating.

A 1/43rd scale MMP kit, built with modifications to include electric train heating and air braking equipment.

The Diagram 99 Restaurant Miniature Buffet coach was built with Commonwealth bogies, weighed in at 38 tons, and could seat 44 passengers in two saloons either side of the bar area. The smaller saloon was designated as non-smoking from new. This particular vehicle was built at BR’s Wolverton Works in north Buckinghamshire in 1960 as part of Lot 30520, and it was originally allocated to the Scottish Region. The model is built to a scale of 1/43rd, 7mm to 1ft, and to ScaleSeven standards. A lot of research was needed to get the underframe details as accurate as possible, enhancing an already comprehensive kit.

A 1/43rd scale MMP kit, built with modifications to include electric train heating and air braking equipment.

This view shows some of the additional braking equipment fitted below the frames. The interior of the coach is also fully modelled—though, sadly, the client didn’t want scale representations of styrofoam cups, stale cheese sandwiches or concrete pork pies!

A 1/43rd scale MMP kit, built with modifications to include electric train heating and air braking equipment.

The buffer beam detailing was interesting and challenging, with the requirement to fit the extra air brake pipework and ETH sockets.

The kit’s designer knows the real thing intimately, and has managed to capture a lot of the subtle detailing of a Mk1 coach in his kit. It is probably safe to say this is about the most accurate Mk1 kit on the market today. As a build, it has been challenging, occasionally frustrating, but ultimately rewarding. There are parts I wish I could have done better, but that seems to always be the way with professional modelmaking.

I build railway models, mainly O Gauge (7mm scale), professionally. You can see more of my work, and read a little about what I do for a living, at my web site. You can follow me on Twitter (search for @HKModelmaker).

And there’s more!

While I had the lightbox out for the diesel photo shoot, I thought it might be fun to take some mini diorama shots of some model aircraft I’ve been building on and off as part of my ongoing Summer 1940 obsession.

Bristol Blenheim MkIVF WR-L, No 248 Squadron Coastal Command, is prepared for another patrol over the North Sea, some time in 1940. Airfix 1/72nd scale kits for the aircraft, oil bowser and Standard Tilly pickup; Flightpath Fordson tractor; Matador Models Albion AM463 refueller.

Bristol Blenheim MkIVF WR-L, No 248 Squadron Coastal Command, is prepared for another patrol over the North Sea, some time in 1940. Airfix 1/72nd scale kits for the aircraft, oil bowser and Standard Tilly pickup; Flightpath Fordson tractor; Matador Models Albion AM463 refueller.

Bristol Blenheim MkIVF WR-L, No 248 Squadron Coastal Command, is prepared for another patrol over the North Sea, some time in 1940. Airfix 1/72nd scale kits for the aircraft, oil bowser and Standard Tilly pickup; Flightpath Fordson tractor; Matador Models Albion AM463 refueller.

Armstrong Whitworth Whitley MkV, GE-B of No 58 Squadron Bomber Command, Linton-on-Ouse, North Yorkshire, gets some last minute attention before being bombed up for a night raid. Summer 1940. Airfix 1/72nd scale kits for the aircraft, oil bowser and Standard Tilly and Bedford ML pickups; Flightpath Fordson tractor.

Armstrong Whitworth Whitley MkV, GE-B of No 58 Squadron Bomber Command, Linton-on-Ouse, North Yorkshire, gets some last minute attention before being bombed up for a night raid. Summer 1940. Airfix 1/72nd scale kits for the aircraft, oil bowser and Standard Tilly and Bedford ML pickups; Flightpath Fordson tractor.

Armstrong Whitworth Whitley MkV, GE-B of No 58 Squadron Bomber Command, Linton-on-Ouse, North Yorkshire, gets some last minute attention before being bombed up for a night raid. Airfix 1/72nd scale kits for the aircraft, oil bowser and Standard Tilly and Bedford ML pickups; Flightpath Fordson tractor.

Traditionally, the Battle of Britain is seen as the mighty Luftwaffe, with four types of bomber and two types of fighter, ranged against the plucky RAF sporting two types of fighter and a few hangers on. My view, and of some historians of the subject, is once you take into account Bomber and Coastal Command numbers, the odds were much more even. So, as kits have become available, I have been adding the other commands to my Royal Air Force collection. In my stash I have a Handley Page Hampden, and I would love a decent Vickers Wellington and Airfix to reissue the Fairey Battle to make my Bomber Command fleet complete.

The only problem with all this model aircraft malarkey is where to store or display them! Outside of cabinets, they’re proper dust magnets!

The latest from the workbench

Life goes on here at Snaptophobic Towers. Despite the real world apparently collapsing at a rate of knots, work must go on. The latest to emerge from the workshop is this static model of a BR Western Region diesel-hydraulic loco D1042 Western Princess.

A 1/43rd scale JLTRT kit assembled to represent D1042 as the loco appeared, ex-works, around 1963. The model is static, and will be displayed in a case.

A 1/43rd scale JLTRT kit assembled to represent D1042 as the loco appeared, ex-works, around 1963. The model is static, and will be displayed in a case.

Close on D1042’s heels are three ex-GWR Collett bow-ended 57ft coaches. More on those shortly, I suspect. Another long-time workbench resident is a BR Mk1 RMB, which after a protracted gestation has finally got the roof fitted and painting under way. Hopefully, those builds plus one other will be cleared relatively quickly, helping the old bank balance, and leaving room for some new projects.

Don’t forget you can keep up with stuff on my web site, and I tweet modelling nonsense @HKModelmaker.

Ex-GWR 4200 Class 2-8-0T

4250 (2 of 8)

4250 (3 of 8)

The latest commission build has just rolled out of the paint shop and had its official portraits taken. Hopefully this will be handed over to its owner next weekend. The 7mm Finescale model represents one of the fairly numerous class of 2-8-0T heavy goods engines designed by G J Churchward for the Great Western Railway at the start of the 20th century. The type was designed for the heavy coal trains from the South Wales coalfields. Many locos survived into the 1960s, and there are at least three in preservation or undergoing restoration.

The model was partially built from a Just Like The Real Thing kit by the client, but he got a bit stuck and asked if I’d take on the project to completion. It has been an interesting exercise, and I have become rather fond of the big beast of a machine. It certainly has some presence on the workbench, and in some ways I’ll be sad to see it go.

I am a professional modelmaker, specialising in railway subjects. You can find out about the work I do on my web site.

On a brighter note…

After a couple of morose postings from me, here’s some good news. A finished model, delivered and paid for, with one happy new owner.

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Riddles WD Austerity 8F 2-8-0 No 90643. This loco ended its days at Aintree Shed, and is depicted in model form as it was photographed at some time in the mid-1960s. For its kind it is remarkably clean, probably not long from an overhaul.

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The model is built from a Just Like The Real Thing 7mm scale 1/43rd kit, with detail additions.

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The crew figures were from Andrew Stadden.

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The weathered finish has been kept to a minimum, with signs of rust, dust and grime beginning to appear.

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I don’t mind admitting this build taxed me at times. It is my first big locomotive, and it taught me quite a few lessons, as well as a few new choice phrases when things weren’t quite going to plan!

There’s room on the bench for another couple of builds now.

Where does the time go?

Hello, remember me? I know. It’s been a long time, but I don’t always have time to keep the blog updated. When I worked at a desk, pushing pixels about all day, then it was easier. Now, I’m pushing bits of metal and plastic about at a workbench, and I rarely sit at the desk even to deal with my email!

So, what’s been happening since my last post? Quite a bit, really. I’ve almost completed two commissions, spent a weekend at a big model railway exhibition up in the Midlands—and came back home with three new commissions to add to the pile—and spent a bit of time sorting the house out.

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On the modelling front, I’ve been doing some personal stuff to do with my ongoing—lifetime? It seems like it!—Battle of Britain project. Airfix has been helping out in this 75th anniversary year by producing some useful vehicle kits (and a slew of new aircraft kits) in the correct scale, one of them being the towed oil bowser here. The tractor is from Flightpath, and was a fiddly but ultimately satisfying cast and etched kit of a Fordson tractor. I now notice Flightpath has introduced the bowser as well, complete with the tractor.

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A couple of kits that have been lurking around the bench for several years also saw some progress. The Albion refueller on the left is typical RAF airfield fodder from the early Second World War; the Crossley breakdown and workshop lorry is less so, but still makes a nice model. The difference between 1/72nd and 1/76th scales becomes apparent here, as the Crossley is the latter, which makes it slightly under scale compared to the Albion.

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Meanwhile, the L&YR Aspinall saddle tank was lettered up, by client request. I delivered it in this shiny form at Telford earlier this month, at the Gauge 0 Guild convention. I looked away and when I looked back it had been weathered by my fellow weekend demonstrator, who goes by the name “Dodgy” Manton. I ought to have taken a picture! A fine job he did, as well.

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This beast is a GWR 5200 Class 2-8-0T, which has been passed to me as a “finish it for me” commission. This is as far as my client got, so I really don’t have a lot to do to complete it.

(Famous last words…)

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At the other end of the GWR spectrum, another broad gauge 6-wheeler has rolled out of the works. It needs a little weathering, but is otherwise complete. My next build for this client is something a little larger, so watch this space.

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Another commission nearing completion is this WD 2-8-0. It’s a big old model, and is just waiting for me to pluck up the courage to make it look dirty. This type of loco was pretty famous for being anything but clean when in service, so I need to break out the weathering and get it looking used.

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Finally, a fairly ropey photo of an ex-GWR Crocodile G trolley wagon, which I built up from a kit I’ve had in the personal stash for several years. I realised I needed some completed models I could show when demonstrating at exhibitions, preferably ones which were going to hang around for a while and not be passed on to their proper owners as soon as they are finished! I have several wagon and coach models I plan to try and complete for showing off purposes, and pragmatically I have opted to build them to 0 Gauge fine scale rather than ScaleSeven, in case someone makes me an offer to buy.

As I have two almost complete builds now, I am considering which models come next in the pecking order. Currently on the bench is an early diesel loco, and I ought to consider beginning construction of three coaches that have also appeared. As I type, I have something like a year’s work, which is satisfying and scary at the same time.

In case it wasn’t obvious, I am a professional modelmaker, specialising in 7mm scale (0 gauge) models. I try to keep the showcase section of my web site updated regularly.

Meanwhile…

Various workbench builds are moving slowly towards completion. The latest is a Just Like The Real Thing Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway 0-6-0 saddle tank, built out of the box without any special Heather Kay extras as an exercise in updating the instructions.

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It’s too shiny, but that will be down to a potential new owner to sort out, hence the lack of company markings or loco number.

Time flies

Is it really a month since my last post? That’s what happens, I suppose, when you get busy.

By busy, I mean I have work stacking up. Client commissions enough to see me through this year and well into the first quarter of 2016. That kind of busy. I really don’t know how I will do it, but do it I must.

Latest over the bench has been a quick build, relatively speaking, of a 7mm scale BR Mk1 four-wheeled CCT. These vehicles were used for the conveyance of cars, parcels, you name it. Anything that needed to be carried at express speeds. The model depicts a typical CCT in the 1970s—though you will note no lettering or weathering: the client will complete the build, so it’s been finished ex-works.

JLTRT BR Mk1 CCT (1 of 2) JLTRT BR Mk1 CCT (2 of 2)

 

It was an interesting build, being relatively simple. With help from friends, I worked out what the brake rigging was supposed to look like, and sourced custom laser-cut glazing to improve the appearance. I think it turned out well.

Meanwhile, the Austerity 2-8-0 build is ongoing, and I am also doing an “out of the box” build of a loco kit to help with reworking the instructions. Of course, I haven’t mentioned the increasing pile of kits that are clamouring for my attention. I’d best be off and stop wasting my time on the internet!

While I’m here…

Austin

This little Austin 8hp saloon passed across the workbench as a brief excursion into something different.

Regular readers will know of my predilection for things 1940, and that I have been slowly building up various models to represent the aircraft of the Royal Air Force and Luftwaffe that took part in the Battle of Britain. The chosen scale has been 1/72nd, for space and consistency reasons and, while nothing concrete has happened yet, there are many plans for dioramas to display various aircraft. Dioramas need props, and I’m always on the lookout for suitable vehicles and buildings to help me.

This car kit was the right scale, and hails from the Czech Republic. I’ve built it to represent a civilian car of the period, rather than the military model it was intended to be. The whitewash marks and the hooded headlamp on the nearside are correct for the summer of 1940. I expect this model to be owned by an RAF pilot, parked near the dispersal area ready to speed him and his chums to a local town for some much-needed alcohol-based relaxation after a heavy day’s fighting.

The Austin 8hp “Four Lite” saloon was launched on the buying public in 1939, only to be virtually stifled by the outbreak of the second world war. Many were purchased by the War Office, and pressed into military service with the British Army as staff cars. Quite a few were taken to France in 1939, only to be abandoned during the evacuation of Dunkirk in 1940. There are photos that show the German Army found these little cars useful, too, and many were used throughout the war. Production resumed after the war ended, until new models were developed in the late 1940s.