Tag Archives: British Railways

Finished!

The final details and spots of paint have been applied. The BR Mk1 build is complete.

These are the “official” photos for my archives. I plan to take the coaches to an exhibition in a week’s time, where I hope the kit manufacturer will be pleased to have them on display for a spell. Nothing like free publicity—which reminds me I need to design a business card…

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The images aren’t up there yet, but do check out my web site at www.heatherkay.co.uk for information about my modelling services. I could also do with a handful of likes to my Heather Kay Modelmaker page over on Facebook, which will tip me into being able to see what the traffic on the page is like. How exciting.

Nearly there

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Two quick portraits of one of the GWR Collett triplets I’ve been working on this past couple of months. This particular coach is a  corridor composite (in other words it has first and third class accommodation) to diagram E127, and the real thing was built in 1925. It’s depicted in the livery it carried until it was withdrawn and scrapped in the early 1960s. This model has just been through final assembly, where the sides, ends and roof are fitted together.

This coach will join the D94 brake third and C54 all third coaches that form the three models of this commission. Currently, on my workbench, I’m fitting the glazing to the C54, while the D94 has been completed bar some small details and quality control issues. Very soon, I shall be able to do the proper photography session for these models, and then deliver them to my client. I think he’ll be very pleased with them—I know I am.

In case you may have forgotten, I am a professional model maker. You can find out more about what I do by visiting my web site, www.heatherkay.co.uk.

 

 

From the workbench

British Rail Diesel Brake Tender.

A what?

In the late 1950s, as the 1955 Modernisation Plan began to take effect with new diesel traction coming into service, the new machines were found to be a little lacking in braking force. At the time, many freight trains did not have any form of automatic braking on the wagons, so the only way to control and stop a train was by the locomotive brakes and a handbrake in the brake van at the tail end.

Not surprisingly, there were a couple of incidents where a diesel was literally pushed along by its train, out of control simply because it hadn’t got braking force comparable with a steam loco. As a stop-gap measure, until continously braked freight trains were commonplace, withdrawn passenger coaches were converted into extra braking capacity for the diesels.

Dubbed Diesel Brake Tenders, the vehicles were made from cut-and-shut coach underframes of ex-LMS or LNER origins with something like 36 tons of scrap metal and concrete added. Attached to the diesel loco, either towed behind or propelled in front, and connected to the loco’s vacuum train brake, the extra four axles with braking helped control the heavy trains.

Brake tenders were generally unloved creatures. They began to arrive in traffic from about 1961, and were finally withdrawn from service and scrapped by the late 1980s. The example modelled is an amalgam of several tatty specimens photographed by Paul Bartlett in the 1970s and 1980s. The model was built for a client from a Just Like The Real Thing kit, with some additions and modifications, to S7 standards. 

Signed, sealed, delivered

I delivered three BR Mark 1 SKs to the client yesterday. He will add the final lettering and weathering. I had to do a bit of tweaking to get them running smoothly on the layout, but everyone was pleased with the finished results.

Happily, another commission came my way while we were at the meeting, this time from another party. You know, there may be something in building things for people after all.

Fresh from the Workshop

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For the past few weeks I have been tweeting about being in the Workshop, busy with a commissioned model for a friend. Today I completed the model, all bar a couple of tiny details, so I took some official portraits for you.

The model represents a British Railways Mark 1 BSK coach originally built in 1955 at Wolverton Works to Diagram 181, in the livery it carried in the early 1980s. The model is built from a Just Like The Real Thing kit at 7mm:1ft scale (1/43rd) to ScaleSeven standards. The client will be applying lettering and final stage weathering.

I hope to be delivering the model to the client soon, and I’ll arrange with him to take some new photos once he’s completed the lettering and weathering.

UPDATE 7/6/11: The client called today, having seen the photos here. He’s really very chuffed with the finished model. Very gratifying.