Tag Archives: model aircraft

Here’s the World’s Best Paper Plane Maker | Wired Design | Wired.com

Spend a few minutes having a look at this guy’s obsession.

Here’s the World’s Best Paper Plane Maker | Wired Design | Wired.com.

There’s also a Flickr photostream with plenty of photos. Impressive stuff. Bear in mind that many of the working items on the real aircraft have been replicated as working items in manila paper and glue.

A little diversion

Having completed the Collett build, I decided to have a week or so just working on personal projects as a sort of break from railway models. I’ve got several very long term projects on the back burner—in fact, it’s getting a bit crowded back there—and just occasionally I shift one to the front for a bit to see if I can get it closer to completion.

One of those projects is a TSR2 diorama. The plan is to represent the first prototype XR219 sitting on the apron at A&AEE Boscombe Down, being prepared for its first flight towards the end of 1964. I have the aircraft, almost complete, just needing some final paint and the transfers applied. I have acquired some of the ancillary vehicles that are visible in documentary footage of the time. It is one of those vehicles I have been giving some attention this week.

IMG_6592

This is a Sentinel Mk1 aircraft tractor. It’s a 1/76th scale whitemetal cast kit from BW Models, and like the real thing weighs an absolute ton. You can see the paint is mostly complete, and I have fabricated a finer windscreen to replace the chunky frame in the kit.

IMG_6594

There’s a bit of paint detailing to do at the rear, to pick out lights and reflectors. Some protective varnish, some suitable transfers, and some subtle weathering, and this will be complete and can go back in its box until the diorama is created.

Just to give a sense of scale, here’s the highly-trained British penny doing the honours.

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What size is it?

In all the time I’ve been posting about the various model-making activities I do I have blithely assumed you will understand what I mean when I spout a scale at you. I’ve realised, of course, that many of you won’t have a clue how big something might be, even with the benefit of a scale ratio.

I’ve decided to adopt the idea, quite frequently used to identify scale in photographs, of using a coin as a reference. It won’t appear in every shot I take of my models, but when I think it needs clarification I’ll pop in specially trained British penny.

It won’t hurt to explain the scales and ratios a little better anyway. I’ll begin with the largest scale I work in, 1/43rd.

Collett Interior 1These figures appeared in an earlier post. They are to 1/43rd scale, in other words 43 times smaller than the real thing. I also refer to this as 7mm scale, which means 7mm on the model equals 1ft or 305mm in the real world. In the UK, this scale is also referred to as O Gauge.

Collett Interior 2

This Dennis Ace fire appliance is to a scale of 1/76th, 4mm to the foot, or OO Gauge.

Collett Interior 3

 

This Gloster Gladiator I is 1/72nd scale, or 4.233mm to the foot, which is an international standard scale for model aircraft. The scale is slightly larger than the British model railway scale of the fire appliance above. Interestingly, a larger “standard” scale for model aircraft, 1/48th, is slightly smaller than the British 7mm scale.

Don’t ask me why these variations exist. It gets worse when you compare railway modelling scales around the world. Let’s just leave it that I work to the British scales—at the moment. It’s a funny old world when you get down to scale modelling.