Tag Archives: prehistory

The British Landscape Club

The British Landscape Club was dreamed up to promote the exotic origins and fabulous history of the British countryside. Anyone can join, there are no membership fees and all we need is an email address so we can send you occasional updates about the site and tidbits of information.

There’s also a book – a bit of a club manual – about Britain’s landscape: The Lie of the Land – an under-the-field guide to the British landscape.

This site needs an occasional plug. I have a copy of the book, and I pop over to the web site for the occasional update and new item. If you are in any way interested in the landscapes, history and story of the British Isles, bookmark the BLC now.

http://www.britishlandscape.org

As the inestimable Ian Vince has reminded me, there is a section of the site which sees regular updates, too.

http://www.britishlandscape.org/reading-the-landscape/index.htm

Avebury – a set on Flickr

A set of photos from my first ever visit to Avebury. I must go back one day. It’s a place that really needs to be lived in or near for a while so you can learn its moods. A couple of hours dodging other tourists is not the best way to understand something so large and so ancient, in my opinion.

What’s Avebury? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avebury

Link to Flickr for those not blighted by Flash.

Kit’s Coty House – a set on Flickr

At some point about 5,000 years ago, a person or persons died. Their friends and relations saw fit to bury them in a long barrow, on the south side of the North Downs overlooking the Medway Valley in Kent.

Over the centuries the earth mound eroded away, although apparently the remains of the mound were still visible in the middle of the 20th century, leaving three standing stones with a cap stone. Known as Kit’s Coty House, the remaining stones stand isolated, near a field edge and the North Downs Way footpath.

I’ve lived in the area for nearly a quarter of a century. I have known of Kit’s Coty House, and the nearby Countless Stones, all that time but never before managed to visit. The monument, one of the first Ancient Scheduled Monuments in the country, is some way off the beaten track, with no easy parking, so despite it only being a couple of miles from home, it’s a proper expedition in order to find it. Well worth the effort, though.